1. Rapana venosa, common name the veined rapa whelk or Asian rapa whelk, is a species of large predatory sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk or whelk, in the family Muricidae, the rock shells. Movement: Vessels. Rapana venosa, the Veined Rapa Whelk, is a large gastropod mollusc native to Northern Asia (Figure 1). The single­ shelled mollusk, \iisually similar to the native whelks (Busycon carica, B. sinistrum, Busycotyjnts canaliwlatus, The rapa whelk or veined whelk, is a large species of predatory snail with the shell reaching lengths of 18cm. A species profile for Veined Rapa Whelk. Rapana venosa, common name the veined rapa whelk or Asian rapa whelk, is a species of large predatory sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusc or whelk, in the family Muricidae, the rock shells. Introduction: The rapa whelk was introduced to the Black Sea in 1940. This fertile sea snail is extremely versatile, tolerating low salinities, water pollution and oxygen deficient waters. Furthermore, aggressive feeders and explosive breeders. Researchers say it will take several years’ worth of information to estimate the size of the whelk population or exactly how far the snail-like creatures roam. [17] This unnatural development of male reproductive organs, however, has shown no negative effects on populations of this species, and no loss of reproductive capabilities of female R. venosa as a consequence of Imposex has been observed so far. 2004) From 1959 to 1972, its range extended into the northwest Black Sea, to the coastlines of Romania, Bulgaria and Turkey. ), Chesapeake Bay, USA. These are sometimes called Busycon whelks. Remarks: Rapana venosa was introduced into the Black Sea in the 1940's and within a decade spread along the Caucasian and Crimean coasts and to the Sea of Azov. Large specimens may be over ten years old. Provides distribution maps and collection information (State and County). [2][3], This species is native to the marine and estuarine waters of the western Pacific, from the Sea of Japan, Yellow Sea, East China Sea and the Bohai Sea.[2]. The outside of the shell is usually grey to red/brown. Native to the marine and estuarine waters of the Western Pacific, from the Sea of Japan, Yellow Sea, East China Sea and the Bohai Sea. [13], Rapana venosa is dioecious, which means each individual organism belonging to this species is distinctly male or female. [3], Veined rapa whelks have caused significant changes in the ecology of bottom-dwelling organisms, and have become marine pests in the Black Sea. Marine Invasions Research Lab. It can prey heavily on native shellfish and aquaculture species. Provides detailed collection information as well as animated map. Please keep the snail alive in seawater. Then in August, the researchers found a distinctive lemon-yellow egg mass in the James River estuary. Molecular studies have shown that there is high genetic diversity among populations and that this is not related to geographic distance between populations. It’s important to report rapa whelk sightings to VIMS so scientists can track their distribution in the Bay. Smithsonian Institution. Within a decade this mollusk had spread along the Caucasian and Crimean coasts and moved into the Sea of Azov. In addition, the unrelated invasive murex Rapana venosa is referred to as the Veined rapa whelk or Asian rapa whelk in the family Muricidae. Rapana thomasiana Crosse, 1861. YouTube; Turkish Marine Research Foundation. Fleeing cold waters in the winter, this species may migrate to warmer, deeper waters, thereby evading cool surface waters. Features: Grey to red-brown shell, with black vein-like pattern, and deep orange interior. In 1946 it was discovered in the Black Sea and later spread to the Mediterranean Sea. Populations in the native area have been overexploited and have severely declined (Yang et al., 2008). Veined Rapa Whelk: it is native to the northwest Pacific, from Vladivostok, Russia to Hong Kong. This invasive species is now established inthe Chesapeake Bay, United Stateswith a known range extending from Tangier Island south to the Bay mouth (Harding & Mann 1999, Harding & Mann 2005). Grows up to 18cm long. These snails have been introduced to several countries including many in Europe and the US. Its natural populations in China are in decline because of overfishing. Introduction. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar. Rapa whelks The Veined rapa whelk is also highly tolerant to wide variations in salinity and oxygen concentration,[11] a fact that may also help to explain its success as an invader of marine coastal and brackish ecosystems. University of Georgia. Preys on bivalves, such as clams, oysters, and mussels (. Native area: Rapana venosa is a native of the Yellow Sea, Bohai Sea, East China Sea, and the Sea of Japan. It is also established in European coastal waters from Norway to Spain. Rapa whelks are native to Asian waters near Japan and Korea. The larvae hide … Unknown, possibly ship ballast water It is suggested that once the rapa whelk reaches adulthood, it exists unchecked in the local population, and can consume and reproduce freely. The external color varies from gray to reddish-brown, with dark brown dashes on the spiral ribs. Fleeing cold waters in the winter, this species may migrate to warmer, deeper waters, thereby evading cool surface waters. Mann R. & Harding J. M. (2000). [9], Veined rapa whelks favor compact sandy bottoms, in which they can burrow almost completely. Some specimens may have distinctive black/dark blue vein-like coloration patterns throughout the inner portions of the shell, usually originating from each individual tooth at the outer lip. Habitat: Hard and sandy surfaces. Further, is a large strikingly beautiful but venomous fish, reaching sizes of up to 45cm. Veined Rapa Whelk or Asian Rapa Whelk: Class: Gastropoda: Family: Muricidae: Genus: Rapana: Impacts: Feeding on native mussels, oysters and other molluscs, veined whelk reduced mussel and oyster stocks, thereby causing a decline in the fish stocks that feed on them. Large and heavy. Map showing the known global distribution of reproducing rapa whelk populations including the native range in Korean, Japanese, and Chinese waters (A.) Mann, R., A. Occhipinti, and J.M. National Invasive Species Information Center, Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database: Point Map - Veined Rapa Whelk.
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